Category Archives: Scenes & Symbols

My Mister Locations: The Countryside (part 5/5)

by @oldschooler

“In the mountains there you feel free” ~ T. S. Eliot, The Wasteland

@rellea translated a post in DC Inside, which pointed out that Park Dong Hoon’s bag symbolises the weight of life that he carries. One place where he consistently does not hold on to his bag is in the countryside.

The countryside in My Mister is a place to which our characters escape to find peace and rest, and the insights they glean during their excursions often constitute a turning point in the characters’ development. In contrast to the city wasteland, with its crammed alleys and the neutral tones of office cubicles and subway stations, the countryside is replete with life and lush colours and wide open spaces. These qualities allow our characters to see clearly the most important facts of their lives for the first time, and to gather strength to act on these insights.
Continue reading My Mister Locations: The Countryside (part 5/5)

My Mister Locations: The Rail Tracks (Part 4/5)

The Hoogye rail tracks are one of the most frequently appearing locations in My Ahjussi, and for good reason: they bring out the alpha male in Dong Hoon.

Dong Hoon is often described as a beta male, as someone who goes with the flow and doesn’t take ownership of his life. Admittedly, Dong Hoon has an unusual level of restraint and tolerance, but that does not mean he is a passive observer of life. He overlooks and tolerates as much as possible, but is quick to take action whenever he deems it necessary. The rail tracks are a testament to this, because that’s where we see Dong Hoon taking action again and again, for better or for worse: Continue reading My Mister Locations: The Rail Tracks (Part 4/5)

My Mister Locations: Hoogye Stop (Part 3/5)

The fictional Hoogye Stop (which is actually Sinjeongnegeori Subway Station on Line 2) stands as a silent witness to some of the more intimate moments in the progression of Lee Ji An and Park Dong Hoon’s relationship, one where they begin as enemies but later turn to something a little more, or perhaps much more, than just friends. Continue reading My Mister Locations: Hoogye Stop (Part 3/5)

My Mister Locations : Dongho Bridge (Part 2/5)

The magnificent Dongho Bridge comes to scene several times in My Ajusshi, but the carefully orchestrated events leading up to its appearance at the end of episode 2 would lead one to think there might be a story to tell. Turns out it is used to signal the beautiful relationship that is about to form between Lee Ji An and Park Dong Hoon.  Continue reading My Mister Locations : Dongho Bridge (Part 2/5)

My Mister Locations: Hangang Bridge (part 1/5)

by @oldschooler

This scenic bridge has been featured in a few Korean dramas (link: Korean Drama Land). Because Park Dong Hoon’s character is portrayed with subdued subtlety and does not betray his true thoughts and feelings to others easily, clues to his inner life are conveyed indirectly through external associations. The Hangang Bridge is the exact location that portrays the state of Dong Hoon’s mind the day after discovering his wife’s infidelity.    Continue reading My Mister Locations: Hangang Bridge (part 1/5)

Their Link is Broken: A Masterfully Conducted Sequence

After all the analyses about the traffic signs, episode 15 makes it painfully obvious that the director was using the traffic signs as a metaphor/ symbol / motif. Even if I missed traffic signs in other episodes, episode 15 was SOOOOO obvious. PD-nim is just brilliant! Aspects of this scene sequence have been analysed before, but what caught my attention is how the scenes were arranged in this sequence. ~ by @africandramalover Continue reading Their Link is Broken: A Masterfully Conducted Sequence

Dong Hoon’s Drawers

I wonder if someone has commented on what Dong Hoon keeps in his drawers: unseen, private, and potentially shameful stuff that others must not know about. The unconscious parts of his desires in which he sometimes loses (aka forgets, represses) stuff when they slip through the cracks and fall behind/below the drawer compartments, as Sang Hoon complains: “He is always losing something behind his drawers.” (paraphrased)

Continue reading Dong Hoon’s Drawers

Park Dong Hoon: Built in 1974, Renovated in 2018. Part 3/3: His Reconstruction

Soompi members discuss how the drama’s structural engineering jargon (cracked concrete, structural reinforcement, pillars, emergency escape routes) mirrors Dong Hoon’s state of life / marriage. What causes these cracks to form, and how can they be reinforced?  Is there an escape route?  Part 3/3: Dong Hoon finally hugs himself and starts making changes to his life.

Continue reading Park Dong Hoon: Built in 1974, Renovated in 2018. Part 3/3: His Reconstruction